Mayans

Mayans

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Popo Blows Off Steam

I have long been fascinated by the volcano Popocatépetl (usually referred to as Popo).  The 17,800 foot high peak stands between Mexico City and the city of Puebla and is Mexico's second highest mountain. 

My first trip to Mexico, back in 1973, was to study at the University of the Americas in the town of Cholula near Puebla.  I arrived at the campus at night, and got settled into my dorm room.  The next morning I looked out my window... and there was Popo!  For a person from relatively flat northern Ohio, the snow capped peak made quite an impression.



A couple years later, I returned to Mexico with my father.  A friend from the University drove us to the Pass of Cortés, at the foot of the volcano.  We had a chance to see Popo up close.




Except for an occasional wisp of smoke, Popo had long been quiet.  Then, beginning in 1994 the volcano came to life, and has periodically spewed steam, gas and ash.  On one occasion when I was in Puebla in the 90s, automobiles parked on the streets were covered with a light dusting of ash.  Because of its activity, visitors are no longer allowed to get as close to the mountain as we were in the picture above. 

Earlier this month, on my latest trip to Mexico, I posted this picture of Popo, taken from the 'Estrella de Puebla", a Ferris wheel on the outskirts of Puebla.




Just last week, Popo was at it again.  On November 25th the volcano erupted for twenty minutes, sending a plume three miles into the sky.  My friend Alejandro who lives in Mexico City did not see the eruption.  The city's air pollution usually obscures the view of the mountain.  However I found these dramatic photos on the internet.



  The eruption seen from Puebla

No damage was done, but it was certainly a spectacular show for the residents of Puebla.

4 comments:

  1. That last picture is just wonderful and doesn't look like it's real, I think the residents of Puebla take this as a normal thing but if I happened to be there at the time of the eruption I would be... frightened, to say the least.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think I would be frightened too. I am no expert on volcanoes, but I would think that these eruptions are better than the pressure building up until the whole mountain explodes.
      Saludos,
      Bill

      Delete
  2. Wow! What an amazing sight! I've seen Popo emitting steam/smoke at times, but never anything as dramatic as what you show here.

    Hope you all are well.

    Saludos,

    Kim G
    Boston, MA
    Where there are no volcanoes for miles around.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I too have only seen wisps of smoke coming from Popo. Like Tino, I would probably be frightened if I saw an eruption of that magnitude. I would want to hightail it away from there with visions of "The Last Days of Pompeii" in my mind. :-)
      Saludos,
      Bill

      Delete