embroidery

embroidery

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Procession of Flowers

I know, this is supposed to be a travel blog, and you are probably wondering, "When are we going to see some more travel pics?"   But this is a "stay-at-home" summer, at least until my friend Alejandro comes up from Mexico for a visit, and I take him on some excursions.  Every day (weather permitting) I have been working in the garden between four and seven hours.  After a day of gardening, I don't feel like uploading old travel photos.  The most I can muster for my blog are some pictures of the garden.

This morning I went out and took some pictures of some of the plants that are currently in bloom.  It is a gray, cloudy day, but I figured that the lack of sun would intensify the color of the flowers in the photos.

So here is what is presently blooming at my place...


Feverfew is a medicinal plant that used to be used for treating fevers, headaches and arthritis.  It is also an attractive decorative perennial with small daisy-like flowers.




Filipendula is a not-so-common plant that likes a lot of water.  Since I have a number of damp areas, I have planted several of these perennials.  They grow fairly tall... more than three feet in height... and they have delicate pinkish flowers.



I previously mentioned and showed a picture of gooseneck loosestrife.  This is its cousin, the purple loosestrife.  It also likes damp locations.



I just planted this blanket flower this year.  Unlike most perennials, it is supposed to bloom all summer long.  We'll see.



I have a large variety of daylilies.  The early bloomers have begun.




I also have some Asiatic lilies which are now in bloom.


 
I used to plant a lot of impatiens as annuals in my shady areas.  However a few years ago, the impatiens in this area were hit by some kind of fungus, and they all rotted.  I haven't tried planting any since then.  However, this variety of impatiens, which is marketed as a "sunpatiens" likes more sunlight, and is supposedly immune to the fungus. 



Most of my flowers beds are filled with perennials which generally bloom once and then are done.  So, to provide summer-long color, on my patios I set out a load of flower pots with annuals.  In the back right corner is a tomato plant.  I used to have a large vegetable garden, but it produced more than I or more neighbors could eat.  So now my vegetable gardening is reduced to one potted cherry tomato plant.

8 comments:

  1. I love the trees, but certainly I also appreciate a well-kept garden with a multitude of flowers, with their color and aroma inspiring joy and content. Congratulations on your garden, I bet you've invested a good many hours but the result is well worth it. I was impressed to read that your old vegetable garden produced more vegetables than you or your neighbors could eat... that would never happen here : )

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    1. Gracias, Tino. I enjoy gardening, but it is a lot of work!
      As for the vegetable garden, I remember one year when my father and I planted cucumbers. I was picking a dozen or more every day. By the end of the season, we, as well as the neighbors, were sick of cucumbers!
      ¡Saludos!

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  2. Love that your garden is so unique with plants I have never heard of! I've been an avid gardener for forty years or so........it's so interesting to see your photos! They are beautiful.

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    1. Thanks, Barbara.
      I have been gardening about the same length of time as you. Each year I add a few new things that I see in the nurseries, so over the years I have amassed quite a variety of plants. Some work, and others don't. For example, try as I might, I have no luck with hydrangeas or rhododendrons.

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    2. Hydrangeas and rhododendrons, which grow well here in Boston, like acid soil. If your soil is "sweet" or alkaline, you'll have trouble. If you really want those plants, you can add flowers of sulfur to the soil and then they should grow, if indeed insufficient acidity is the problem.

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    3. I'm not sure of the PH of my soil, but my azaleas, which are also acid lovers, are doing quite well. I will give my sorry rhododendron acid fertilizer this year, and if it doesn't start shaping up next year, it's "adiós".

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  3. After four to seven hours of gardening, I'm amazed you have the energy to write a blog post, LOL...

    My own garden (which prefers to mostly remain anonymous) is looking quite fabulous these days, despite being covered by multiple feet of snow for most of the winter. The roses especially are spectacular this year.

    Saludos,

    Kim G
    Boston, MA
    Where having a large-ish yard is a mixed blessing.

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    Replies
    1. After working in the garden all day, about all I feel like doing is vegetating in from of the computer screen.
      I suspect that your heavy snow might have insulated your roses from the cold. My roses really suffered. I dug out one of my rose bushes (the one which had previously been the largest and most beautiful) and the others are limping along. Most of my roses are "Knockout Roses" which are supposed to be nearly indestructible. I planted three new bushes this year. We'll see how they fare.
      ¡Saludos!

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